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Tag Archives: Letters

The Wednesday Letters by Jason F. Wright

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The Wednesday Letters by Jason F. Wright

This book I have to say was exactly as advertised. It is described as a literary fiction book focused on family secrets. Not something I usually go for, but the premise of the book caught my attention – a couple who wrote letters to each other every week pass away and their children find the letters. That seemed quite interesting to me, so I picked it up.

The story follows the three children of Jack and Laurel. Matthew is the eldest and lives with his wife in New York where they are having trouble getting pregnant. Samantha is a single mother who took a job with the local police force to stay close to home and raise her daughter. Malcolm is a hothead who fled the country after getting in a fight with his ex-girlfriend’s new boyfriend. All three descend on the bed-and-breakfast their parents ran after their death and unwittingly discover the letters their father, Jack, wrote to Laurel every Wednesday since their marriage night. Within the letters, family secrets are discovered, hearts are broken, and family ties strained. Old loves add more strain to the situation. The epilogue at the end is actually an envelope glued to the back cover with a letter inside.

I can’t say the story line was very surprising, but there was enough interest to keep me reading. The book was full of emotion and easy to relate to. It’s actually interesting that through the whole book, you are rooting for Malcolm. There were a couple twists and turns, but it was fairly straightforward. It was really nice to read letters from Jack to Laurel throughout to gain information as the children were. It broke the book up nicely and gave you different perspectives on the events in the book. The end result of all the secrets and family drama was surprising in a way you wouldn’t expect.

The characters were amazing well-developed, particularly Jack who was only known through his letters. You don’t really get a feel for Laurel because everything you learn about her is second-hand. Aside from Jack, Malcolm and Rain are the next mostly developed characters. Matthew is probably the least developed of the siblings, but you get an image of him easily. The other characters in the small town are brought to life through simple interactions with the members of the family and through the letters being read. The story flowed well and moved nicely. There were no awkward areas where the story was dragged along. Between the letters, people arriving for the viewing and funeral, and Malcolm’s issues with his history, there was always something to move toward.

If you like literary fiction or family fiction, this would be a great book for you. I thought it was good, but not something I would pick up again. I feel like it would be more for people in their thirties or older. I’m almost thirty and I think a little more life experience would make the book more connectable and memorable. It does teach some great life lessons and gives some good advice on love.

My rating:

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The Lettered Affair by Alice Ayden

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The Lettered Affair by Alice Ayden

So this book was written as a 4 novella series. It actually read somewhat like a magazine or newspaper serial that you would read week after week. The books picked up directly after the first one ends as if there was no break. Additionally, the entire series was written in the form of letters between the characters. Most times that doesn’t work out as well as the author hopes, but in this case it worked brilliantly.

The story follows two sisters as they deal with the people in their lives in Victorian England. Cassandra is the elder sister who has married the  cousin to which her father’s house was entailed. It was not a love match, but they get along fine. She meets Lord Halithorpe, Henry, and falls in love. As she would never betray her husband, this puts a great strain on her when she finds out her love is returned. Cassie’s sister Juliana is the youngest sister and refuses to marry  without love. After Cassie is married, she goes to the home of a friend, where she meets Lord Kemnay, Retton, whom she works with regularly to help his sister. In the midst of all this is Henry’s brother, Nathaniel, and Juliana’s mother (Cassie’s stepmother) Patience make it their mission to destroy the two girls and their options for happily ever after.

I actually greatly enjoyed how well-developed and complex the characters were in this book. Through the letters being written back and forth between the characters (it’s not just between Cassie and Juliana, but between all the characters) you get a real sense of what they’re like. Some of the letters are written as scenes, but they are put in such a context that you get to see the scene and not forget you are reading a letter. You fall in love with the girls’ beloved. You are entertained and delighted with the grandmother of Henry and Nathaniel. You feel compassion for Retton and a building hatred and pity for Patience and Nathaniel.

Even though it is written through letters, the story is amazingly easy to follow, but still complex. There were twists and turns that I had not expected, but did a fantastic job of further developing the characters and keeping the story line from going stale. It is a clean romance as well, which was wonderful because you could focus on the myriad of emotions playing through all the letters.

I’d definitely recommend this to anyone who likes historical romances or clean romances. Also, anyone who enjoys fiction that focuses on the development of relationships and even mind-games. For anyone getting into historical, clean romance or fiction, this would be an interesting book to start with. I thought the story line was  fresh, the twists and turns kept it from being a standard or overused story line I’ve read before. Also, the format kept the information presented interesting because you would cleaning switch between characters. A definite read-again in the future.

 

My rating:

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