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Tag Archives: Historical Romance

Mary and the Captain by Nancy Lawrence

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Mary and the Captain by Nancy Lawrence

This is another sequel to Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice that focuses on Mary. I can’t say this one was as good as others I’ve read but I can’t say it was completely terrible either. It’s better than a lot of the work I’ve read and had a decent story line.

The story follows Mary as she is planning for a small family Christmas with Jane and Charles Bingley. Charles’ sister Caroline invites their other brother, Captain Robert Bingleyand her best friend Helen. Caroline is hoping that Robert will propose to Helen over the Christmas holiday, as he has been majorly courting her throughout the season. Mary is not happy with this as she does terribly around people and just wants to be around people with whom she can be relaxed and let her guard down.

Throughout the holiday activities, Robert notices more and more things about Helen he doesn’t like that he hadn’t noticed (or was prevented from noticing) before – and there are more and more reasons he finds to spend time in Mary’s company. He and Mary  work together to help save a stable boy Robert encounters on his way to Charles’ house. As the two spend more and more time together, the more Mary fights her feelings and becomes miserable. The events culminate in an eventful ball right at the end of the story.

I have to say the story line was original. I had a few twists and turns that I didn’t see, but for the most part it was fairly straight forward. You could see most of the events coming and how the people would react to them. I can’t say there was a lot of emotional development throughout the book, but that is mainly because the characters are set up and described so well at the beginning of the book and don’t change overly much throughout. They are fully developed characters that work in the story line, but the time frame doesn’t allow for major emotional or personal growth.

I’d recommend it to fans of Pride and Prejudice sequels that focus on Mary. This book includes Kitty and Jane to some extent, and of course Charles and Caroline are there, but there is minimal influence to the story line outside of Robert and Mary. I liked the way Jane was portrayed in this book. She seemed to be the individual that grew the most between Pride and Prejudice and this book. Overall, it was a good, solid, interesting read. I can’t say I’ll read it again readily, but that is mainly because once you know the story line, there really isn’t much to draw you back in. It is completely clean, and therefore suitable for all audiences.

My rating:

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Awakened Hearts by Susan Potts

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Awakened Hearts by Susan Potts

I have to say this is by far the best Pride and Prejudice sequel focused on Mary that I’ve read. I think it’s either fan fiction or a self-published author because it doesn’t have a cover and seems to only be available through Amazon Kindle.

The story takes place about two years after the conclusion of Pride and Prejudice. Sometime between the end of Pride and Prejudice and the beginning of this book, Mary has realized how pompous she sounds and becomes painfully aware of her shortcomings. The book describes how she isn’t really aware that most of her shyness and social anxiety, which leads her to be standoffish or rude, is mainly rooted in low self-esteem. At the beginning of the story, Mary is invited to Pemberly to visit Elizabeth and her new nephew, Elizabeth desiring to develop a closer bond with her sister. While at Pemberly, Mary makes the aquintaince of Georgiana and Colonel Henry Fitzwilliam (both of whom made appearance in Pride and Prejudice). Through these two and her sister Elizabeth, Mary begins to gain confidence and work through the issues that hold her back. Over the course of the book, Mary and Henry become closer and eventually fall in love. Henry is also dealing with issues throughout the book as he transitions from being the second son to being the only heir after his brother dies, and he has to take command of an estate and come to terms with his new lifestyle.

I thought this was an amazing well written book for starters. I never would have pegged it for a person’s first work. There are no, or minimal, spelling and grammar errors and the story flowed fantastically. The emotional development throughout the story was phenomenal and the descriptions of Mary’s life paint an amazingly vivid picture of what it can be like to grow up invisible. Furthermore, the struggles that Mary goes through are extremely relateable, particularly for me, and I emotionally connected with the book on a level I don’t usually do. The interactions between the characters was also natural and developed at a realistic pace. Furthermore, you get to read from a few different characters’ perspectives which adds more interest to how others view Mary and Henry throughout the book.

I actually felt that I was reading a continuation of Pride and Prejudice, not a book that was written more than a hundred years later. The vocabulary and phrasing wasn’t the same as Austen, but it also wasn’t completely modern. It seemed to be a wonderful blend of the two that gave you the same feel as reading Austen.

I highly recommend this book to anyone who loved Pride and Prejudice and likes to read sequels, particularly those about Mary. It is an entirely clean book so it is suitable for all ages. The only references to sexual intercourse were made using “the marriage bed” and “her [wifely] duty”, and it was only described as a pleasant experience. Overall a fantastic historical light romance with strong emotional pull.

My rating:

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My Darcy’s Dream (Darcy Series #6) by Elizabeth Aston

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My Darcy’s Dream (Darcy Series #6) by Elizabeth Aston

So I didn’t think this was particularly part of a series when I bought it. While reading it I realized that, technically, it’s a stand-alone book. However, I think that reading the other books in the series first would have been a huge help. As I didn’t read Mr. Darcy’s Daughters I was confused on who the characters were and how everyone was related. I can’t say that those characters factored much into the story, however, they were referenced a lot. The only thing that really helped was that some of the characters provided backstory or servants called them by different names.

The story follows Mr. Darcy’s niece Phoebe (the daughter of Georgiana – which I didn’t figure out until halfway through the book). She had been proposed to be a man that she was completely in love with and thought above reproach. Her father rejects the proposal, describing the man as a rake and wholly unsuitable for his daughter. When she searches for answers she stumbles upon circumstances that make her believe her father. In despair she retreats to Pemberly for the season where she is joined by Jane and Charles Bingley’s daughter Louisa. The two wish to spend a quiet season in the country, only planning the traditional mid-summer ball for the Pemberley estate. Unfortunately, their plans are side-tracked when the Phoebe’s lost love reappears in the country seeking her out.

Overall, the story wasn’t bad but I was expecting something a little more mature, in the same vein as Austen. This story was, however, very predictable and seemed geared toward a younger audience. It is a completely clean read, so suggesting this book to teens, particularly girls in may 7th grade or up would be completely acceptable. They may not understand all the undercurrents or side comments that go on with the snide remarks that were typical of the Victorian era society but that is not altogether a bad thing.

The characters were fairly well developed, but could be done a little better. There was very little actually connected to the original Pride and Prejudice but that is to be expected in the sixth book in a sequel series. The story line could have picked up its pace somewhat though. The majority of the book were Phoebe avoiding the man that only wanted to talk to her in order to explain things. If they had done that soon, there honestly wouldn’t have been much of a book. The side story with Louisa Bingley was a nice touch and I actually enjoyed that plot line more. There were also the standard characters resembling members of the original book, but that made it somewhat more predictable instead of adding in new personalities that could add strife and drama.

All-in-all a light, enjoyable read that is good for the beach or an easy night. Not a whole lot of thinking involved or elegant, advanced vocabulary like you’d expect from Austen, but a clean, fairly interesting read. I’d suggest it to young adults more so than grown adults. I would, however, suggest reading the other books in the series first.

My rating:

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The Chamomile by Susan F. Craft

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The Chamomile by Susan F. Craft

I wasn’t all that sure I’d like this book when I started to read it. It seemed a little too simple and it drug a little bit. However, a couple chapters in the story line really picked up. I was actually impressed with how much happened in the book without it seeming packed with ridiculous events pilled on top of each other.

The story follows Lilyan and is told solely from her point of view. She lives in Charleston with her brother, Andrew, and her companion, Elizabeth. After her brother is arrested for joining the Patriots, Elizabeth begins to work as a spy and pass along information. She meets Nicholas, a Patriot captain, and the two have a slow building, cleanly written love story.

The author did a fabulous job of incorporating some history into the story line. You didn’t learn a whole lot of history through the book, but you got enough to get a sense for the time period, learn some interesting tidbits, and follow the story and its place in history. The story line moved at a great pace, not too fast and not too slow. After the first few chapters, which kind of dragged on a little bit, the content really propelled the story along. I can’t really say action because a lot of the book was talking and getting information.

The characters were quite complex for a shorter book. You got a real feel for the characters and their personalities right from the start which is somewhat difficult to do. The book also really pulled you in to what Lilyan is feeling throughout the story and you feel what she’s feeling and hoping for her dreams. It’s also not a book where you start yelling at the characters because they’re doing something stupid. You don’t really feel that they are acting counter-productively to their wish, which is what happens in some books. The events happen in a logical order and are plausible enough that you don’t start wondering if this could actually happen.

I strongly recommend this to people who like historical fiction. It’s supposed to be for teens and young adults, but it can be read by adults as well. The story is complex and this would be a great read to start historical fiction. There is a love story wrapped up in the more complex war story line. It’s also a clean book, so it would be good for anyone. There is some violence, but it’s not over-the-top and it’s in a normal context. There are some rough scenes so I probably wouldn’t recommend it for below middle school. It was a great book, but probably not a re-read.

My rating:

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The Lettered Affair by Alice Ayden

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The Lettered Affair by Alice Ayden

So this book was written as a 4 novella series. It actually read somewhat like a magazine or newspaper serial that you would read week after week. The books picked up directly after the first one ends as if there was no break. Additionally, the entire series was written in the form of letters between the characters. Most times that doesn’t work out as well as the author hopes, but in this case it worked brilliantly.

The story follows two sisters as they deal with the people in their lives in Victorian England. Cassandra is the elder sister who has married the  cousin to which her father’s house was entailed. It was not a love match, but they get along fine. She meets Lord Halithorpe, Henry, and falls in love. As she would never betray her husband, this puts a great strain on her when she finds out her love is returned. Cassie’s sister Juliana is the youngest sister and refuses to marry  without love. After Cassie is married, she goes to the home of a friend, where she meets Lord Kemnay, Retton, whom she works with regularly to help his sister. In the midst of all this is Henry’s brother, Nathaniel, and Juliana’s mother (Cassie’s stepmother) Patience make it their mission to destroy the two girls and their options for happily ever after.

I actually greatly enjoyed how well-developed and complex the characters were in this book. Through the letters being written back and forth between the characters (it’s not just between Cassie and Juliana, but between all the characters) you get a real sense of what they’re like. Some of the letters are written as scenes, but they are put in such a context that you get to see the scene and not forget you are reading a letter. You fall in love with the girls’ beloved. You are entertained and delighted with the grandmother of Henry and Nathaniel. You feel compassion for Retton and a building hatred and pity for Patience and Nathaniel.

Even though it is written through letters, the story is amazingly easy to follow, but still complex. There were twists and turns that I had not expected, but did a fantastic job of further developing the characters and keeping the story line from going stale. It is a clean romance as well, which was wonderful because you could focus on the myriad of emotions playing through all the letters.

I’d definitely recommend this to anyone who likes historical romances or clean romances. Also, anyone who enjoys fiction that focuses on the development of relationships and even mind-games. For anyone getting into historical, clean romance or fiction, this would be an interesting book to start with. I thought the story line was  fresh, the twists and turns kept it from being a standard or overused story line I’ve read before. Also, the format kept the information presented interesting because you would cleaning switch between characters. A definite read-again in the future.

 

My rating:

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Penelope (Fairweather Sisters #1) by Anya Wylde

Penelope (Fairweather Sisters #1) by Anya Wylde

I picked this book up because it said it was a clean historical romantic comedy, which I am finding I like greatly. I have to say it is exactly as advertised. It takes place in the early 1800s and is a really good historical romance. I have to say it is one of the few books that has made me laugh out loud while I was reading multiple times. I really is worth the read.

The story follows Penelope, a country bumpkin from a small town in the rural country. Penelope’s mother died when she was very young, but not before extracting a promise from a Duchess to look after her daughter. The dowager takes Penelope under her wing and brings Penelope to her son’s,the Duke’s, London home. The hilarity starts as soon as Penelope arrives, hours late, soaking wet, and in the company of her pet goat. Mishap after mistake after accident follow as the young girl tries to bloom into a young woman. She annoys and angers the duke at every turn, embarrasses her friend, and has run-ins with thieves and highwaymen. Throw in a few more interesting characters and you have a wonderful, light-hearted read that is worth the time.

The characters are well-developed and completely relateable. My biggest complaint is the grammar issues, of which there are several. The storyline was smooth and didn’t drag.  It was predictable but definitely has enough twists and turns to keep it interesting. The love story could have used a little more work, but it added to the comedy in places. The length was good and fit well with the story. The story was only told from Penelope’s point of view except for a couple places that are from the Duke’s. Having more of the Duke’s perspective could have helped, but for this story it wasn’t necessary. I highly recommend this to anyone who likes historical romance.

My rating:

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