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Tag Archives: 1800s

Highland Healer (Highland Healer #1) by Florence Love Karsner

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Highland Healer (Highland Healer #1) by Florence Love Karsner

I got the impression this may have been the author’s first book. I can’t say it was written poorly or that the story line needed developed, but it was a little choppy in places and areas were a little hard to follow. This story follows two women. The description and such explain it as just following one woman, Caitlin, but early on it begins a parallel story line with Millie. For a while I wasn’t sure if Millie’s story line was a history of something that needed to be known for something in Caitlin’s story to be understood, but the two women meet each other about half-way through the book and the story continues on with them together.

The story begins with Caitlin settling in to a new home she finds after fleeing an angry Captain who thinks she is a witch who killed his son. As she is a healer, she has work in the nearby village and a quiet life. She is interrupted one night by the MacKinnon brothers, whose youngest has suffered a terrible injury and must have his leg amputated. While they wait for their brother to recover enough to be moved, the eldest brothers, Jack and Alex, begin to know the healer. Alex in particular becomes attached to the healer and after hearing her plight about the Captain (and also an enraged Lord who she overheard talking treason) is determined to help her. After they leave, the Captain finds Caitlin and she takes off for the northern MacKinnon lands in search of help.

That all seems pretty simple, but the author weaves a second story line into the  book. Millie is the wife of the Lord Caitlin angered. The story encounters Millie as she is devising a way to flee her abusive life and return to her family’s land in Scotland. She makes her escape while heavily pregnant and encounters Caitlin in her flight.

Also, Caitlin’s uncle Wabi is a wizard and has been trying to teach Caitlin about the powers she holds within herself. He pops in and out of the story, being quite skillfully depicted and lively. When Caitlin’s powers do finally emerge, the shock of them leaves her reeling and seeking guidance.

This book is part fantasy, part classic romance, and part woman power. Each chapter you are following and different character, which is confusing at first, particularly when they start introducing Millie’s story line. However, after the two story lines combine it gets easier. For the most part you are following six different characters and each usually gets their own chapter or part of a chapter in a cycle. The characters are extremely well developed. You have a definite feel for each character and what they are going to do. She even makes the people who aren’t there real through memories or stories of the other characters. The story could have used a little more down time and a little less conflict. I think she could have cut out one less enemy and still been fine. The accent of the brothers is heavy Scottish brogue, so if you’ve never read or heard it before that can be confusing as well.

Overall, not a bad book. It was good, just really complex. Anyone who is sensitive toward domestic abuse probably shouldn’t read it. If you like fantasy books that aren’t too out there, this is a great book. If you like reading fiction that takes place in Scotland, it is also a great book. I can’t say I’d recommend this for anyone getting into the genre because it can be confusing and it’s not quite built up well on the magical end (Wabi explains his abilities and powers well, but when it comes to Caitlin it’s very confusing). Overall, a decent read.

My rating:

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Mansfield Park by Jane Austen

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Mansfield Park by Jane Austen

I’ve been a Jane Austen fan for a while now. My favorite of her works was Persuasion until I read this book. I absolutely loved Mansfield Park! Like all her other works, there is romance throughout, but not the near erotica of today’s romance. There’s no sex, no innuendo, no open sexual flirtation, just a little hand-holding (rare) or a kiss (very rare), but primarily just the interesting conversation and lively interactions between ladies and gentlemen.

Mansfield Park is the story of Fanny Price. Fanny was born to a rather poor family with a load of children. When her mother’s older sister offers to raise Fanny, she is sent to live at Mansfield Park at the age of 10, far away from her family and closest sibling, her older brother William. However, she takes of residence with her aunt and uncle Mr. and Mrs. Bertram and their four children – Tom, Edmund, Maria, and Julia. While growing up, she becomes close friends with Edmund and a personal helper to Mrs. Bertram. She is quite content with her second-place role to the rest of the children in the family. Also, there was Mrs. Norris, Fanny’s other aunt and Mrs. Bertram’s sister who is a continual busy-body in their life and reminding Fanny of how grateful she should be for the wonderful life she had been given.

The meat of the story falls just after Fanny turns 18. The elder sister of the Bertram family, Maria, lands a fiance and eventually a husband in the wealthy, but boring Mr. Rushworth. A new preacher moves into the area and his wife brings her younger sister and brother for an extended visit. The sister, Mary Crawford, begins to court Edmund and the brother, Henry, is a player who plays with the emotions between Maria and Julia. Eventually, there is a big kerfuffle at which point Maria’s husband decides to remove himself and his wife to his estate to the north, away from Henry Crawford,  Henry Crawford is essentially banned, and both Crawfords retire to town. Edmund is heart-broken, Fanny is heart-broken for Edmund, Julia is heart-broken, and Maria finds herself trapped in a loveless marriage.  Later, Henry Crawford pops back up when Fanny is visiting family and begins to court her. Fanny attempts to shake off the courtship but cannot seem to manage it. Eventually, Henry returns to town to wait for her he says while Fanny tries to convince Edmund that Mary Crawford doesn’t really love him.

It is a highly emotionally charged book. I loved Fanny and felt a strong connection with her. You felt each one of her emotions as she dealt with her growing emotions and love for different people. Her emotions are so pure and real you cannot help but relate to her. I found myself often yelling at the other characters because you could see what should happen but everyone was messing around. It was a fabulous book that I will be reading again.

My rating:

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The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving

 

I chose to read this book because it always pops up around Halloween and I felt like reading it. Usually, I am pleasantly surprised by classics and I fall in love with them. However, it was not the case with this book. After reading it, I chose to place it in my reading challenge as “a book with bad reviews”. After I read it, I looked it up on Goodreads and Amazon and I was not surprised to find that others did not like it as well.

My biggest issue was the story line – there really wasn’t one. The story opens with Icabod Crane moving to Sleepy Hollow to teach and starting to woo a wealthy heiress. There are other suitors that are also vying for her attention. The story discusses two or three times he meets with her and ends when he is chased by the headless horseman and disappears. That’s it. That’s the whole story. There really isn’t any emotional depth to the characters, actually you don’t know much about anyone except Ichabod. The book talks a lot about how superstitious he is and how he studies the various myths and legends of ghosts and witches, thus leading to him being so utterly terrified by the headless horseman. Also, I usually love the language used in classics, but in this book it didn’t work as well. There wasn’t a large range of vocabulary and the sentences and phrases were all set up similarly which did not help the story in any way.

I do have to say that as an audiobook, the narrator, James Mio, did a phenomenal job. He added a lot of emotion to his voice and stressed different words and phrases to add emphasis, as well as drawing out different areas to create suspense. Unfortunately, I wouldn’t recommend this book, which is rare for me. For as much drama and action the narrator added, it was really dry and boring.

My rating:

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